Beyoglu

Center of Istanbul

Beyoglu Tours & Experiences

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Beyoglu

Where is Beyoglu?

Beyoglu; A strong oriental blend of the West wind in Istanbul. Beyoglu area of Istanbul; The most exciting colorful part of the city, Nostalgia, memoirs, anecdotes, sepia-colored photographs, and an antiquarian taste for objects and ephemera from the period became a trademark! Istanbul; A city of many lives – many districts and many masters.
Some regard only the busiest and most colorful quarter occupying the ridge to the east of the Golden Horn to be worthy of the name, limiting Beyoglu to the section between Tünel and Taksim. Others are more generous and include the Galata district within its confines, thus allowing Beyoğlu to begin at Karaköy and extend as far as Taksim. Today it is generally considered that Beyoğlu begins at Karaköy and extends as far as Taksim.
Istiklal Avenue - Street, or more commonly known as ‘Beyoglu’, is one of the oldest and most prominent areas of the city of Istanbul. It is an area, which has richness and profundity in terms of its history and cultural background. If asked, perhaps every resident of Istanbul would express their fond memories of Beyoglu from days in the past, particularly the older generation.

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Beyoglu  - Levantine Cultural Milieu & The Story of “Le Carnaval A Constantinople”
Istanbul; Almost every poet would have a go at praising the splendor of the city, composing odes eulogizing the shores of the Bosphorus, glorifying its Imperial palaces, and acclaiming the charm and magnificence of its gardens and promenades.
 

Where is Beyoglu?

Beyoglu; A strong oriental blend of the West wind in Istanbul. Beyoglu area of Istanbul; The most exciting colorful part of the city, Nostalgia, memoirs, anecdotes, sepia-colored photographs, and an antiquarian taste for objects and ephemera from the period became a trademark! Istanbul; A city of many lives – many districts and many masters.
Some regard only the busiest and most colorful quarter occupying the ridge to the east of the Golden Horn to be worthy of the name, limiting Beyoglu to the section between Tünel and Taksim. Others are more generous and include the Galata district within its confines, thus allowing Beyoğlu to begin at Karaköy and extend as far as Taksim. Today it is generally considered that Beyoğlu begins at Karaköy and extends as far as Taksim.
Istiklal Avenue - Street, or more commonly known as ‘Beyoglu’, is one of the oldest and most prominent areas of the city of Istanbul. It is an area, which has richness and profundity in terms of its history and cultural background. If asked, perhaps every resident of Istanbul would express their fond memories of Beyoglu from days in the past, particularly the older generation.
 

Beyoglu During The Rule of Ottoman Empire

During the Ottoman Empire, the cosmopolitan Beyoğlu milieu created by foreigners, Levantines, non-Muslim minorities and, finally, Turks who made up the population of the district gave rise to a quite distinctive type of culture in which the dominant role was undoubtedly played by foreigners. Members of the foreign, Levantine and non-Muslim minority communities built large, imposing business premises, dwellings and apartment blocks in Galata and Beyoğlu.
Throughout the centuries, distinguished mainly by its European flavor and cosmopolitan character and also having possessed a culture markedly different from that of the other districts of Istanbul, Beyoglu had always been the very center of entertainment, education, and culture. Beyoglu; Pluralism, westernization, cosmopolitanism, a mosaic of peoples, modernity, had become the keywords of this new fascination for a foreign and exotic environment.
The face of Beyoglu had started to change with the establishment of the first foreign embassy in 1535 by France. Due to the increased trade between France and Ottomans following the capitulations granted during the 16th and 17th centuries, English, Venetian, Dutch, Polish, and Danish embassies were also established in the area.
 
Beyoglu; A quite distinctive blend of culture! By the beginning of the early 17th century, all started with the story of the cosmopolitan “Pera” created by the western culture, diplomats, foreigners, Levantines, non-Muslim minorities and, local Ottomans.
The embassies, the major hotels of the time, the famed passages and cités, well-known shops, photographers’ studios, banks, schools, or major apartment buildings are typical examples of such structures that easily make their way into any compilation on the area, thus becoming emblematic landmarks. The U.S. Consulate building in Beyoglu was one of the greatest examples.
Beyoğlu had built up an environment which fostered tolerance and breaths of outlook, in which bigotry and fanaticism had no place, and its ability to create such an environment was due partly to the existence of a cosmopolitan community most of whose members had received a sound, modern education, and partly to a superstructure composed of the court, the parliament, military schools and barracks, as well as schools employing foreign languages as the medium of instruction, theatres, cinemas, cafés, chantants, patisseries, coffee-houses, meyhanes [pubs], tourist hotels and luxury stores, all of which combined to create a general atmosphere of tolerance and free thought.
Throughout the centuries, Beyoglu indeed displayed a high level of ethnic, religious and national variety, which is a fact often emphasized by foreign travelers who enthusiastically recounted the unique experience of watching this variegated crowd Istiklal Avenue Street - Pera & Beyoglu – Istanbul.
 

Beyoglu During Nineteenth Century

Nineteenth-century Beyoğlu possessed a culture markedly different from that of the other districts of Istanbul, is distinguished mainly by its European flavor and cosmopolitan character. The families of Italian extraction who had for centuries inhabited the district combined with the numerous European residents clustered around the Beyoğlu Embassies to form the nucleus of the Western orientated community that was to give rise to this unique cultural phenomenon.
While significant numbers of foreigners gathered in the Beyoğlu district, the Levantines from Galata and the local non-Muslims tended to congregate around the Cadde-i Kebir or Grande Rue de Pera, now known as Istiklal Avenue -Street, and these were joined by large numbers of non-Muslims from other districts of Istanbul or migrants from the various towns and cities of the Ottoman Empire who preferred Beyoğlu as a site for their businesses and their homes.
Many of the Beyoğlu Levantines belonged to families that had lived there for generations, while others were later arrivals who had, however, spent the greater part of their lives there. Most of the foreigners were connected with the embassies and consulates, but there were others who had arrived on pleasure or business and had extended their stay for months or even years.
 
In the 19th century, the very privileged position held by Beyoğlu ensured that it was here the Western novelties and innovations first appeared. The district still occupies a privileged position, but for very different, wholly economic reasons. Beyoğlu is no longer graced by court or parliament, military schools or barracks, nor does it owe its peculiar atmosphere to the presence of a cosmopolitan community. Yet Beyoğlu is now much closer to the West than it was in the days when its streets were thronged with a cosmopolitan elite. Beyoğlu still has its theatres, cafes, chantants, meyhanes(pubs) and luxury hotels, but the epoch of its peculiar privilege as the district of innovation and a modern life-style is now closed forever.
It was here that Western artistic trends found a favorable soil in which they could take root and develop, and it was the Levantine and non-Muslim minority groups inhabiting the district that were the main beneficiaries of the movement. With the opening of a theatre in Beyoğlu in the first half of the 19th-century audiences were able to enjoy Western operas and plays performed in European languages.
During the 19th century, Beyoglu had considerably diverse social, physical, and cultural structures and strata. In this period, Beyoglu faced a significant transformation and according growth.
Although these foreigners were of many diverse ethnic origins the fact that most of the Levantines were of Latin extraction meant that the Beyoğlu cultural scene was dominated first and foremost by the French and Italians, followed by the Anglo-German group composed of English, Germans, and Austrians.
Such a historical texture dominated by the image of a posh avenue lined with prestigious Ar! Nouveau buildings inhabited by rich bakers of diverse non-Muslim identities and surrounded by luxurious shops, brasseries, theaters, and cafés—concerts catering to their refined and westernized tastes.
An important role in founding and developing these enterprises was played by the Levantines and the various foreign groups. The new theatres, hotels, cafés chantants, and shops were generally opened or run by foreigners in collaboration with their local non-Muslim partners, and the Levantines and foreigners attracted to Istanbul by the higher profits to be made here and the more comfortable lifestyle to be enjoyed usually settled in the Galata or Beyoğlu districts.
Apathetic imitation of western metropolises to Europeans, a reassuring haven of freedom and power to their inhabitants, an appealing but alien showcase of modernity to Muslims, Beyoglu had, by the turn of the twentieth century, become a multifaceted cliché and a multilayered satire.
 

Communications Between Istanbul and Beyoğlu

Communications between Istanbul and Beyoğlu were greatly improved by the construction of the first bridge over the Golden Horn in 1836. The ‘Tünel’, a funicular railway that might well be regarded as the first underground in Turkey, was opened in 1875. Construction work on the Galata embankment, the first proper wharf on the Beyoğlu side, was begun in 1892.
 

Beyoglu Today

Istanbul’s most famous street, pedestrianized Istiklal Avenue – Street (Independence Avenue), throbs day and night and offers a fantastic array of architectural sights, shops, treats, and throngs upon teeming throngs of people. At the avenue’s northeastern end is expansive Taksim Square, thought by many to be the very heart of the city, with many of Turkey’s most renowned restaurants and some of Europe’s most happening nightlife in close proximity.
In striking contrast, Beyoglu’s less trafficked areas – such as the affluent Cihangir and the antique district of Cukurcuma – exude Old World charm and provide contemplative calm and splendid diversion via an assortment of cozy cafes, attractive boutiques, and quiet lanes.
Beyoğlu as a representative of a modern, contemporary way of life and with its theatres, cinemas, cafés, chantants, patisseries, coffee-houses, meyhanes [pubs], tourist hotels and luxury stores, had always been the center of tolerance and free thought atmosphere. What a feeling that is -  Walking the cosmopolitan Beyoğlu milieu created by the foreigners, Levantines, non-Muslim minorities – Truly the sights and sounds of “Le Carnaval A Constantinople”!
Beyoglu does not tell its past, but contains it like the lines of a hand, written in the corners of the streets, the gratings of the windows, the banisters of the steps, the antennae of the lightning rods, the poles of the flags, every segment marked in turn with scratches, indentations, scrolls. The historical cosmopolitan site of Beyoğlu/Pera stands today as not just a multilingual interaction zone, but a cultural network that is inherently hybrid.
Beyoglu today is one of the most visited and attractive spots of Istanbul in terms of its liveliness and nightlife. Piccadilly Circus of London, Times Square of New York, or Champs Elysees of Paris would be considered as corresponding examples to Istiklal Avenue - Street.
Especially in the last 40 years, Beyoǧlu and its proximate neighborhoods Peran, Taksim, Cihangir, Galata and Tarlabasi became the focal point of tourist entertainment, consumerism and artistic creativity in Istanbul. At the same time, feminist, sexual rights orientation and human rights activism found shelter also in Beyoglu.
In every sense of the word; Beyoglu has a very fascinating and often baffling compilation of a wide variety of information, ranging from history to folklore, from streets and monuments to individuals of all walks of life, and popular poetry.
 

The Art & Culture in Beyoglu

The Beyoğlu urban area of Istanbul had become the very center of cultural hub where art and cultural events gravitate towards globally and locally more integrated and connected streets, and the events are so distributed as to offer a rich range of proximate and more distant destination choices to those moving around the city.
 
The interculture sited in Beyoğlu/Pera has served as a dynamic source of options currently enlarging the repertoires of cultural revival not only on a “minority” level but also on a “majority” level with the greater involvement of Turkish publishers, translators, and readers.
Beyoglu is one of the most visited and attractive spots of Istanbul in terms of its liveliness and nightlife. Piccadilly Circus of London, Times Square of New York, or Champs Elysees of Paris would be considered as corresponding examples to Istiklal Avenue - Street.
Also being the center of art & culture, there are some vintage bookshops, where you can find some interesting books on Istanbul to take back home with you as a souvenir as well as some art galleries featuring art by world-famous contemporary artists and local talents. Beyoglu & Istiklal Street certainly has a lot to offer for many ideas that challenge status quo, break the chains and buck the trends.

 
The Stone & Masonry Buildings in Beyoglu

The fascination for Beyoglu also seems to stem from its urban texture and from the extent of its commercial variety. Much like its successors more than three centuries later, its description of Beyoglu rests on elements that differentiate it from the city that lies on the other side; Stone and masonry buildings, streets organized in a grid pattern, impressive quantity of shops and marketplaces, and the presence of non-Muslim and foreign merchants...

 
Beyoglu Things To Do

The Beyoğlu/Pera district, the heart of cosmopolitan Istanbul, is conceived as a site of “interculture”, of interaction, involving a nexus of different ethnic, cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Interculture; What a “mosaic” of many cultures, representing mutual recognition and tolerance!
Enjoy a ride on the nostalgic tram in Beyoğlu while watching the crowds and shop windows from your seats as the tram travels along the Grande Rue de Pera, known today as Istiklal Avenue - Street.
The century-old art nouveau building Mısır Apartmanı, on the lively Istiklal  Avenue - Street, attracts art lovers with its architecture as well as the numerous galleries that it houses.
The narrow streets winding between historic buildings, the smell of local cuisine and Turkish coffee fill the backstreets of Istiklal. If you like to taste local wine, make sure to stop by one of the historic wine houses at Pera.
Walking along Istiklal Avenue - Street; A walk filled with reflections, emanations, and repercussions! Istiklal Avenue - Street, being one of the main shopping streets in the city, it includes some good quality cafes, teahouses, and restaurants as well as world-famous brands and some local fashion. A walk full of creative ideas that inspire engage and excite!
 

Nevizade Street

Nightlife famous Nevizade Street just behind the fish market is guaranteed to have one of the most fun nights of your trip here in Beyoglu. Nothing feels better than a perfect day in Beyoglu ending in Nevizade Street at night!
 

French Street

The "French Street" (Fransız Sokağı) in Beyoglu "Rue Francaise", with tented buildings, street musicians, cafés, bars, and art centers is world-famous. The street behind Galatasaray High School known as Cezayir (Algeria) Street was completely renovated from A to Z by a group within the scope of a two-year project.
The buildings and sidewalks were improved and a special music system was established. The stones of the street were arranged by Parisian architects, and 100-year-old coal-gas street lamps from the Municipality of Paris were installed. The French have a very important legacy in Beyoğlu. Most of the establishments of Beyoğlu, such as the first cafés and first movie theaters, were established by the French in the 19th century and the buildings on the left of Cezayir Street bear the signature of French engineer-contractor Marius Michel, who lived in Istanbul between 1890 and 1910.
French Street in Beyoglu has an area of 9,000 square meters and a capacity of 3000 people. The number of daily visitors is around 8000. The heaters on the streets allow the open areas to be used even on cold days. Various establishments in two-three story buildings have turned Fransız Sokağı, formerly Cezayir Sokak or Hayriye Cıkmazı, into a 7-day-a-week live culture and entertainment center, with cafés, restaurants, street concerts and artists, and an art gallery.
 

Galatasaray Square

The sculpture made by Şadi Çalık in the memory of the 50th Anniversary of the Republic in this small square reflects recent history. Yapı Kredi Nedim Tör Museum and Kazım Taşkent Art Gallery, located directly on the corner of the Yapı Kredi Bookstore, are home to exhibitions organized in a wide range of exhibitions. The entrance is free.
 
Galata Whirling Dervish Hall & Sufi Mevlevi House
Whirling Dervishes & Sufism A Mystical Form of Islam; With its historical Main Door, Galata Mevlevi Lodge awaits you at one end of İstiklal Street of Beyoğlu, and to the left at the beginning of Galip Dede Street. This lodge would be referred to as Galata or Kulekapısı Mevlevi Lodge or Galip Dede Tekke, during the Ottoman era. It was established in 1491 and represents the most important Ottoman works in Beyoğlu along with Galata Palace School. In 1975, it was opened to visitors as Divan Literature Museum before it was reorganized as Galata Mevlevi Lodge Museum in 2011.
 
The Century-Old Story of the Egyptian Apartment
The Mısır Apartment whose architectural features considered a blend of European modernism and arabesque defined as art nouveau by certain art historians is one of Istanbul’s first reinforced concrete buildings. The Egyptian Apartment was built by Hovsep Aznavurian in 1905 as a winter home for Egypt’s Hidivi Abbas Halim Pasha. The building was sold to Hayri Ipar from the sugar cores of the period by his successors when Abbas Halim Pasha died in the 1940s.
The 19th century, with its rising wave of Westernization, signified a period of change in Ottoman architecture and buildings in neoclassical, neo-Gothic, neo-Renaissance, neo-Baroque and neo-Byzantine styles began popping up especially across Istanbul’s Galata, Pera, Kurtuluş, Cihangir, Taksim and Pangaltı neighborhoods.
 

Galata Tower

The tower was built in the 14th century by the Genoese who had semi-independence from the Byzantines. It was part of their fortification. The Romanesque style Galata Tower was built as Christea Turris (Tower of Christ) in 1348 during an expansion of the Genoese colony in Constantinople. The tower was used as a prison and a fire tower during the Ottoman era.
Galata Tower was the tallest building in Istanbul at 66.9 m when it was built in 1348. It was built to replace the old Tower of Galata, an original Byzantine tower named Megalos Pyrgos (Great Tower) which controlled the northern end of the massive sea chain that closed the entrance to the Golden Horn. That tower was on a different site and was largely destroyed in 1203, during the Fourth Crusade of 1202–1204.
The upper section of the Galata Tower with the conical cap was slightly modified in several restorations during the Ottoman period when it was used as an observation tower for spotting fires.
There are historic monuments and temples worthy to visit in Beyoglu.
 

The Church and Convent of St. Anthony

Today, the most popular and imposing landmark of Catholicism existing in Istanbul is the church and convent of St. Anthony on Istiklal Avenue - Street, the old Grand Rue de Pera, administered by a community of Franciscan Conventuals whose presence in Istanbul dates back to the early history of this Mendicant Order in the thirteenth century.
 

The Church of St. Louis De Francis

Saint Louis de Francis Church is located in the Beyoğlu district of Istanbul. It is strongly recommended to pay a visit if you are in and around Taksim and Beyoğlu area.
 

Beyoglu to Cappadocia

Beyoglu to Cappadocia - Invoking the timeless spirit of Ancient Silk Road -  Istanbul to Cappadocia. Istanbul - The center of the world
As Above So Below!
 
As Napoléon Bonaparte said, “If there was only one country in the world, its capital would be Istanbul.”
 
Istanbul; The most colorful and exciting city on earth where the crossroads of civilizations meet, and part again. Such a beauty like no other on earth; vibrant, vital, and breathtakingly beautiful.
 
Istanbul, situated at the end of the Silk Route and at the crossing point between Europe and Asia, was indeed by far the wealthiest metropolis in the early middle ages and served as a melting pot of cultures and religions from the east, west, north, and south. This is the very reason why the city is often referred to as "the crossroad of civilizations"
 
A timeless fusion of inspired architecture and serious cultural chic in the heart of Istanbul; Beyoglu - intrepid, cosmopolitan and inspired - yet infused with the sights, sounds, and inflections of modern-day Istanbul.
 
Walking along Istiklal Avenue - Street in Beyoglu!  A beginning of a journey along the Silk Road - A journey of transformation, a meeting point of cultures from east and west and a path to dreams and the unknown.
 
Beyoglu to Cappadocia, starting the mystery and adventure of the legendary Silk Road in Beyoglu, a pathway to dreams and transformation, and finally reaching Cappadocia where travelers of all stripes reach their spiritual home, and leave rested, relaxed and revitalized.
 
Cappadocia; It is like being on another planet filled with lunarscape panoramas and ‘fairy chimney’ rock formations. In light of accordion ridged valleys, shaded in a palette of dusky orange and cream. What a feeling that is – Like Psychedelic Daydreams!
 
Cappadocia; What a fantastical topography matched by human history! Civilizations have long utilized the region's soft stone, seeking shelter underground and leaving the countryside scattered with underground cavern architecture.
 
Beyoglu to Cappadocia – Such a trip inspired by the promises, stories and riches of the Silk Road; from silkworms and butterflies to spices, potions, caravans and oases  and tales of love and adventure - Staying in one of Cappadoccia’s exquisite cave hotels and witnessing the spectacular surreal landscape from a hot air balloon at sunrise.
 

Beyoğlu to Sultanahmet

Walk Across Galata Bridge and Explore the Old City of Istanbul. Also, the tram from Kabatas to Sultanahmet will take you over the Galata Bridge. Although crossing the bridge by tram probably won't provide ideal sightseeing opportunities, You can always get off the tram at Eminonu either on the way, or on the way back, and hang around the bridge. In this sense, walking is certainly recommended. 
 

Beyoglu To Grand Bazaar

Pera’s main boulevard, the Grande Rue de Pera; By the late nineteenth century, however, Ottoman influence was waning with the rise of powerful European nations, and the empire needed to catch up with the West in all means.
 
A new European district called Pera ( Beyoğlu) grew in popularity. Pera was located across the Galata Bridge from the old-city peninsula and the Grand Bazaar—in those days, effectively a world away. Pera’s main boulevard, the Grande Rue de Pera, glittered with European-style shops and cafés, glamorous fashions, and daring theater
 
The Grand Bazaar - Turkey’s most authentic self; During the fifteenth century, the Byzantine city of Constantinople was conquered by Ottomans in 1453. Constantine XI, the last Byzantine emperor, was killed in battle, and the city—commonly called Istanbul, after a Greek phrase for “into the city”—came under the conqueror’s expanding Ottoman Empire.
 
Two years later, the Ottoman Sultan Mehmed sought to stimulate its economy, and so in the winter of 1455, he ordered the construction of a “bedestan”, a covered market—the nucleus of what would eventually become the Grand Bazaar. It was located in the center of the old city, in the heart of the peninsula, and it was not far from the Hagia Sophia, to whose renovation much of its profits would go. The bazaar eventually would consist of sixty streets, twenty-two gates, and twenty-nine hans, or storage sections. The warrens expanded with the city’s growth, and they contracted with the city’s disasters, its earthquakes and fires. But in the beginning, the bazaar was almost like the establishment of a city by those not accustomed to one.
 
During the reign of Süleyman the Magnificent in the sixteenth century, the longest-serving emperor of the Ottomans, the bazaar housed much of the empire’s treasury, its jewels, and weapons. In every sense of the word, the Ottomans favored the idea of concentrating trade in one place as a guarantee against theft, and the labyrinthine layout and thick walls of the bazaar made it an especially safe place in the city.
 
In the Grand Bazaar eventually appeared coffee shops and tea shops, sherbet sellers and simit sellers, as well as beautiful upper-class women seeing and wanting to be seen—in a high-end spot where, because of the bazaar’s security and association with wealth, they could feel safe.
 

Beyoglu To Kadıkoy

Almost all the newcomers to the city usually first visit either Istiklal Avenue-Street Pera Beyoglu or the old city Sultanahmet. Istiklal Street stands out as the most vibrant avenue of the city lying from Taksim Square to Tunnel.
The next day, the beauty and charm of the Asian side of Istanbul start newcomers wondering and gravitates them to visit. Kadıkoy is in the heart of Istanbul’s Asian side. Kadıkoy – A Living Queen!
Around Kadiköy you can get a tram to Moda, another famous neighborhood. Full of upper-class buildings, this is where some celebrities live. What is so nice about there? The pier and the stunning Marmara Sea view. A coffee or a tea, the seagulls and nature will reward you!
The best and easiest way to from Beyoglu to Kadıkoy is through using the “Tunel” (underground funicular line) at the bottom of Istiklal Avenue-Street.  Underground funicular is located exactly where the Tunel Square is. The funicular line directly takes you to Karakoy which has a pier and ferries going to Kadıkoy. So simple!
 

How To Reach Beyoglu From Istanbul Airport?

The new Istanbul airport is located next to the Black Sea on the European side, about 42 km away from Istiklal Avenue-Street Beyoglu and 48 km from Old City - Sultanahmet.
 

Havaist Airport Shuttle

Havaist is the airport shuttle service working several bus lines between the new Istanbul airport and all over Istanbul. You directly can take the line IST 19: New Istanbul Airport – Beşiktaş – Taksim (also stops at Zincirlikuyu and 4. Levent Metro). Then you can get off at the last stop, close to Taksim square. From there you can either walk to your hotel, take a taxi or the metro. To reach Taksim, it’s really straightforward. You take the line IST 19: New Istanbul Airport – Beşiktaş – Taksim (which also stops at Zincirlikuyu and 4. Levent Metro) and you get off at the last stop, in front of the Point Hotel, close to Taksim square. From there you can either walk to your hotel, take a taxi or the metro.
 

Is Beyoglu A Good Place To Stay?

Definitely Yes!  choose Beyoglu. All the neighborhoods of Beyoglu; Cihangir, Galata, and Karakoy are all part of the larger Beyoglu district and they’re all popular places for locals to go out. Cihangir is also popular amongst hipster locals and expats. Istiklal Avenue Street & Pera Beyoglu - Continuously in Flux & Alive!
 
Istiklal Avenue – Street Beyoglu is also the best area for nightlife and eating out. There are plenty of Turkish restaurants and nice back streets with cafés and terraces that offer a very attractive happy hour. There are also opportunities for historical sightseeing linked to Istanbul’s past relationship with Venice.
 

Where To Eat Beyoglu?

In every sense of the word, Istiklal Avenue – Street Beyoglu is a food and restaurant heaven. There are plenty of Turkish restaurants and nice back streets with cafés and terraces.
 
During your walk from Taksim Square through Istiklal Avenue – Street, you will be bombarded with at least one hundred delicious eats. The kebab wheels turning and chestnuts roasting mingled with fresh seafood at the Fish Market makes your head spin. Nearly every type of cuisine is represented in Istiklal Avenue – Street Beyoglu.
 
You also can eat in one of the places that are based on the old days, you can go to the historical fish market and eat fish in Çiçek Pasajı in Asmalimescit in the evening hours.
 

Where To Stay Beyoglu?

The first foremost thing you should keep in mind is, your accommodation in Istanbul needs to be a smart choice. Of course the price, comfort, and ratings are important but also what matters the most is you wouldn’t want to stay in an amazing hotel completely far away from the action, from what to do in Istanbul.
 

How Far Is Beyoglu From Taksim?

All parts of Istiklal Avenue Street are in a very close lovely walk distance. The distance between Beyoğlu and Taksim Square is 1 – 1,5 km.
 

Beyoglu Restaurants

All kinds of food platters available according to all scales of budget indeed. There are also many high-end restaurants all along Istiklal Avenue Street Beyoglu.
 

Beyoglu Rooftop Bars

Rooftop bars and restaurants in Beyoglu with superb views across the Bosphorus and modern cuisine that fuses east and west are among the highlights at the top of Istanbul's food chain, say the Istanbul Eats bloggers.
 

Beyoglu Rooftop Restaurants

Nothing feels better than eating outside! Eating outside with stunning views of the Bosphorus, and Istanbul skylines. The best Istanbul restaurants with a view, which makes the perfect setting for a romantic date, or a place to relax with a glass of wine to celebrate this amazing city.
You will not only enjoy the food in these restaurants, but also the view, be it of a city skyline at night or a spectacular view of the Bosphorus. The eyes have it at these top restaurants in Istanbul with a view.
 

Beyoglu Bars

Istanbul's varied nightlife scene stretches from the good-time heart and soul of Beyoğlu to the pulsating suburbs of the Asian side of Istanbul, Kadıköy, and Moda.
There is a population of over 15 million, and half of them seem to descend on Beyoğlu and neighboring districts on Friday and Saturday evenings in search of a good time. In Beyoglu, from hip rooftop bars and raucous indie clubs to basement jazz cafés and grungy rock bars, as well as traditional Turkish folk venues and cool dance clubs, many options are available.
 

Beyoglu Hotel

Hotels, located in Beyoglu and with Taksim Square reachable within 400 – 900 meters are recommended. Your hotel being in close distance or rather within the walking distance is important indeed.
Come & Feel The Difference With Us While Exploring Istiklal Avenue Street Beyoglu Istanbul - Walk in Beyoglu!
 
 
 

Beyoglu Comments

R
Rudolph - September 08, 2019

We went there last week. It was a very impressive museum with very beautiful pieces. It was not too big. There was a small coffee where they serve high quality coffee and delicious cakes.

D
Denise - August 24, 2019

We got the pass for 3 days. When we extended our stay in Istanbul we extended our pass as well. Next to traditional visiting places other activities are selected well. Madame Tussauds, was incredible.

J
Josephine - June 16, 2019

I spent the whole day in that museum. I am an art lover and it was awesome to visit there. There were 3 floors of different styles of displays and all of them were impressive.

E
Eleanor - June 15, 2019

I use always Tourist Passes on my travels. I am a routine user. According to Istanbul the content seems some poor. Also they can add some discount in some restaurants etc as well.

B
Bennie - March 22, 2019

The Pera Museum should not be missed in a visit to Istanbul. It is easy to access, not far from the other attractions. It is close to Taksim area. If you go there, definitely visit that museum. I am generally not interested in museums, but tend to go because my wife likes them. Both of us loved Pera Museum.

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